Tag Archives: Victorian

Broadmoor Revealed – Victorian Crime & the Lunatic Asylum

Today on No wriggling I am lucky to have a guest post from Mark Stevens, Senior Archivist at Berkshire Record Office, responsible for looking after the Broadmoor Asylum archives. Pen and Sword Books have recently published a revised and expanded edition … Continue reading

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The most beautiful words ever written?

I have been on my own for two days. The family is away being athletic – not a talent I can share with them. So who could I turn to for company but John Keats? Yesterday I re-read Isabella: or … Continue reading

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On Victorian London, forensics and writing inspiration: a conversation with D.E. Meredith, author of The Devil’s Ribbon

Today I am lucky enough to have a guest on my blog – the author D. E. Meredith writer of the historical crime series, The Hatton and Roumande Mysteries featuring the first forensic scientist, Professor Adolphus Hatton, and his trusty … Continue reading

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On Shelley, secrets and weaving fact with fiction in ‘A Treacherous Likeness’….

One of my favourite reads of 2012 was Tom All Alone’s by Lynn Shepherd. The grim realities of Victorian Britain were brought to life for a 21st century audience and the fictional worlds of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins (often … Continue reading

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Love poems you wish you had written #2 – Elizabeth Barrett Browning

  This is such an enjoyable series to work on . It is made more poignant for me at the moment as I spend a week away from my husband, ostensibly writing ‘Shell-Shocked Britain’ for Pen and Sword Books. Perhaps, … Continue reading

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Sarah’s story – family history and poetry from the darkest places…

In a previous post, I wrote of Sarah Hardiman, the first (and only legal) wife of my Great Grandfather George Hardiman. George Hardiman was a journeyman silversmith, born in 1839 in an impoverished part of Clerkenwell, North London. Sarah (nee … Continue reading

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Calling Clerkenwell home – roots in roguish & revolutionary soil

The line between ‘family’ and ‘social’ history is becoming ever more blurred. For me, studying my tree has always been more about the history surrounding the lives of my ancestors than finding each and every distant relation. I know I … Continue reading

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