Who needs Glastonbury? The Keats House Festival 2014

keatshseAs many of those who read my blog regularly will know, I am a Londoner born and bred, not moving away from the city until I was 25 and and retaining my love of my roots even as I live now in Somerset, which I reached via Brighton, sometimes referred to as ‘London by the Sea’. I return to central London regularly for research trips or events, but rarely find myself as far out as the North London suburbs which I remember so well from childhood.

I was not a rebellious teenager, far from it. As I have recently written for The Wordsworth Trust blog, I fell in love with the words of a dead poet when my friends were finding more to identify with in the lyrics of Gary Kemp of Spandau Ballet, or Boy George.  John Keats may have been little more than five feet tall, but his personality was as large and vibrant as any new romantic.

So it is with a sense of deep frustration at my inability to attend that I alert you to a wonderful festival that is taking place in Hampstead, London from this Saturday, 7th June, until the 15th. Keats House (which I always think of as Wentworth Place) is celebrating the 200 years since Keats wrote his first poem, as a teenager studying to be an apothecary.

Although the weather does not promise to be kind, for this weekend at least, the House and garden will host a range of events for adults and children to inspire and delight. There will be writing workshops and family fun days and the terrific actors  Simon Russell Beale and Dame Janet Suzman will read a selection of Keats’s poetry (although I do wish they would have younger actors reading his words, to capture something of his own voice).

Daljit Nagra, the latest Keats House poet in residence.

Daljit Nagra, the latest Keats House poet in residence.

Keats House has a poet-in-residence, and the wonderful Jo Shapcott will be handing over the baton to Daljit Nagra and both will take workshops during the week to help you find your own poetic inspiration. It isn’t all about Keats; there is dancing, screenwriting, censorship and ‘Poeticabotanica’. And afternoon tea with Keats. Bliss.

I would have been particularly keen to attend ‘Writing the Frontiers of Life, Death and Sickness’ on the 11th,  where Sam Guglani, Jo Shapcott, and award-winning poet, novelist and playwright Philip Gross ‘explore and celebrate the interactions between poetry and medicine today’. This is a subject that fascinates me. To ignore the influence of Keats’s long study of medicine on his poetry is to miss so much of what was important to him, and what traumatised him and changed his perspective on what it meant to be alive.

So I can’t be there, but if you are in London over the next few days why don’t you take a look at the website The Keats Festival 2014 and see if there are any tickets available? You can doff your cap to the great man for me and learn a little more about his lasting legacy to us all.

 

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This entry was posted in Art, Books, History, Keats, London, Music, Poetry, Reading, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Who needs Glastonbury? The Keats House Festival 2014

  1. navasolanature says:

    I too am a Londoner born and bred and apart from a few years in the 80s have lived there all my life until this new venture of mine at our Finca Navasola in Spain. But I love returning and was just in time for at least one workshop at Keats House for the festival. All very inspiring!

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